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Champions to Cure Duchenne

At SEMbio, we are fortunate to partner with clients that make it their mission to bring treatment options to those who otherwise have none. We are very drawn to those with a servant’s heart. And I am so blessed that our SEMbio family shares that quality.

My husband and I were honored to attend the Champions to Cure Duchenne charity event this weekend at the University of Texas Golf Club in Austin. This annual event to benefit CureDuchenne began in 2009 and has raised more than $2 million for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy research.

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is a devastating and fatal genetic disease commonly affecting young boys, resulting in progressive muscle wasting. Most boys are wheelchair-bound by the age of 12; many don’t live beyond their 20’s. Even worse, there is no known cure.

Many of the diseases our clients seek to treat are somewhat enigmatic. Having the privilege of meeting these young men, their families, their family friends, ALL of their champions—it changed everything for me. Duchenne has a face, a heart, a laugh, a clever sense of humor, and with the help of so many with a servant’s heart, hopefully, will soon also have a cure. The Revell family, whose ADORABLE sons Andrew and Timothy were living it up at the soiree, and the Rothe family, whose son Nathan, a sophomore vocal performance major at the University of Texas, performed a version of “Hey Jude” that brought hundreds to their feet, (and before you ask, of course, we joined in for the “na-na-na-nas”)

See The HEY JUDE video here! 

I am changed, and I am inspired. And I am honored to participate, even in the smallest of ways. So, give of yourself if you can. It’s better for the soul than chicken soup

Author: Mary C. Morton 

A SEMbio co-founder and managing partner, Mary is also a member of the prestigious Pinnacle Society. Mary graduated from The University of Texas at Austin, College of Natural Sciences, with a Bachelor’s degree in Biology, and additional studies in UT’s College of Pharmacy. She takes the necessary steps to make an employer-employee match that’s “right” instead of simply “right now.”